Currently Browsing: Tattoos

Gods, deities, demons & people

Gods, deities, demons & people   [Show as...

Namakubi

Namakubi Namakubi (severed head) in a tattoo can be used to show courage, a warning, respect for foe, or just as an image of no fear.  One message behind this tattoo is to show a willingness to accept your fate with honor.  The image is usually very visual and brutal, but this isn’t only meant as a shock factor, but also as an element to the circle of...

Kitsune – Fox

Kitsune – Fox A kitsune (狐) is a mythical fox from Japanese folklore.  They are often depicted as intelligent beings and having magical abilities that can increase with their age and wisdom. One of their most famous abilites is to assume a human appearance. While they are often portrayed as tricksters, other stories depict them as guardians, friends, and lovers....

Koi Tattoos

Koi Tattoos The Koi ( 鯉) as a symbol represents perseverance in the face of adversity and strength of character or purpose.  In Japan and China the koi has long been a symbol of masculinity and strength. [Show as...

Phoenix Tattoos

Phoenix Tattoos In Japan, the mythical Phoenix or Hō-ō (鳳凰) was adopted as a symbol of the imperial household, particularly the empress. This mythical bird represents fire, the sun, justice, obedience and fidelity.

According to legend (mostly from China), the Hō-ō appears very rarely, and only to mark the beginning of a new era — the birth of a virtuous ruler, for example. In other traditions, the Hō-ō appears only in peaceful and prosperous times (nesting, it is said, in paulownia trees), and hides itself when there is trouble. As the herald of a new age, the Hō-ō descends from heaven to earth to do good deeds, and then it returns to its celestial abode to await a new era. It is both a symbol of peace (when the bird appears) and a symbol of disharmony (when the bird disappears). In China, early artifacts show the Phoenix (female) as intimately associated with the dragon (male) — the two are portrayed either as mortal enemies or as blissful lovers. When shown together, the two symbolize both conflict and wedded bliss, and are a common design motif even today in many parts of...

Japanese Dragon Tattoos

Japanese Dragon Tattoos Japanese dragons (日本の竜 Nihon no ryū) are diverse legendary creatures in Japanese mythology and folklore. A mythological animal of Chinese origin, and a member of the family of serpentine creatures who protect Buddhism.  Images of the reptilian dragon are found throughout Asia, and the pictorial form most widely recognized today was already prevalent in Chinese ink paintings in the Tang period (9th century AD). The mortal enemy of the dragon is the Phoenix, as well as the bird-man creature known as Karura. In contrast to Western mythology, Asian dragons are rarely depicted as malevolent. Although fearsome and powerful, dragons are equally considered just, benevolent, and the bringers of wealth and good fortune. The dragon is also considered a shape shifter who can assume human form and mate with people. [Show as...

« Previous Entries